1881 Silver Dollar Value

  
  1. 1881 Silver Dollar Value O
  2. 1881 Silver Dollar Value Miss Liberty
  3. 1881 Silver Dollar Value Uncirculated

USA Coin Book Estimated Value of 1889 Morgan Silver Dollar is Worth $35 in Average Condition and can be Worth $61 to $415 or more in Uncirculated (MS+) Mint Condition. Proof Coins can be Worth $3,068 or more. USA Coin Book Estimated Value of 1881 Morgan Silver Dollar is Worth $35 in Average Condition and can be Worth $64 to $755 or more in Uncirculated (MS+) Mint Condition. Proof Coins can be Worth $3,249 or more. Click here to Learn How to use Coin Price Charts. Also, click here to Learn About Grading Coins. Value of 1881 Morgan Silver Dollar The 1881 Morgan silver dollar was struck in large quantities at the Philadelphia mint. Quite a few bags were released in the 1950s and 1960s; indeed, so many that in 1955 one dealer offered rolls of 20 Uncirculated coins for $25, equivalent to $1.25 per coin. Today, circulated specimens are very common.

Coin Values Moving with Precious Metals: Up-Dated 2/8/2021: Gold $1813 Silver $26.90


1881 Morgan silver dollar value ranges from $25.44 to $27.01 for most circulated examples.

With today's silver price theses old silver dollars are worth a nice minimum value. Also, pay particular attention to your coin's condition, top quality silver dollars are of great interest to collectors.

Without a doubt you have a valuable coin. Now let's accurately find its highest value. Starting with its condition, 1881 silver dollars that have worn surfaces are available to collectors in quantities. Scarce and highly valued are those with no wear or as collectors and dealers term 'uncirculated' condition.

Pictured is a prime collector coin. This 1881 dollar is not only uncirculated but its bright original luster is free of contact marks. Value in the market is above $53.08 .

Looking at the value chart, those in top condition and rare mintmarks stand out. Both judging condition and finding mintmarks is covered in detail below.

Next, turning to Mintmarks, these are small letters found on the coin and used to identify the different mints producing silver dollars in 1881. Of the four mints involved, Carson City struck just a fraction of the total, considered scarce they are highly collectible and valued today.

If your silver dollar was minted at the small branch mint in Carson City you have one of the rare coins of 1881. On the reverse under the knot in the ribbon the different mints placed their mintmark. Carson City used a 'CC' mark, New Orleans an 'O' and San Francisco an 'S' mintmark. If your coin lacks a mintmark it was struck at the main mint in Philadelphia.

1881 Morgan Silver Dollar Values
Condition of Coin
DateGoodFineExtremely
Fine
Uncirculated
1881 Morgan Silver Dollar Values Updated 2/8/2021
1881 $25.44 $25.44 $28.24 $53.08
1881 CC $194 $232 $261 $330
1881 O $27.01 $27.01 $29.58 $51.74
1881 S $25.44 $25.44 $28.24 $51.74

Rising Above $100 1881 Morgan Silver Dollar Value

Value

Two different rare 1881 silver dollars are pictured, both are valued by collectors above $100 and are great examples to add to their collections. Condition and eye appeal of the top coin sets it apart from most 1881 dollars, untouched since minted its lustrous and vibrant toning with mark free surfaces showcase the classic beauty of the Morgan design.

1881 Silver Dollar Value O

Despite light wear the second 1881 silver dollar commands a value well above $100. Minted at Carson City few are available to collectors, scarcity raises the value. Its majestic size, popularity, and the nice original antique look is not hampered by trace amounts of circulation wear. Absent are distracting bumps or scratches typical of large coins. An acceptable amount of wear is distributed evenly across its surface.

Both 1881 dollars pictured represent coins of collector quality and solid value. Examine and judge your coin carefully, it could easily meet the desires of collectors placing your 1881 Morgan silver dollar value above the $100 mark.

Key to 1881 Silver Dollar Value is Judging Condition

Follow along with the images and descriptions as a Morgan dollar begins to wear from freshly minted 'Uncirculated' condition, to a very worn example in 'Good' condition. By judging the different stages of wear, a 'Grade' is determined. The greater the detail remaining, the greater your 1881 Morgan silver dollar value.

Uncirculated: A silver dollar in the 'uncirculated' grade never saw use in commerce. Your coin must not show any signs of wear and retain the look of brand new, often with natural toning that occurs to silver coins. Look for the first signs of abrasion from wear on the highest part of Liberty's cheek below the eye and the front of her chin. Wear to the surface removes the delicate texture of original mint luster leaving these areas dull.

Extremely Fine: Slight wear of design limited to only the tops of the highest points, defines the 'extremely fine' grade. Loss of detail is minor with the merging of just a few strands of hair found above Liberty's forehead and below her cap. Folds in the cap also show small amounts of rubbing with a tiny loss of roundness. Your coin still retains a pleasing sharpness in appearance.

Fine: Once distinct and well defined features of Liberty are now reduced by moderate wear, lowering the grade to 'fine' condition. Leaves surrounding the cotton blossoms are only outlines lacking inner detail. Many finer strands of hair have worn to the point of combining into larger flattened areas. Your silver dollar gives the impression of wear but not excessive.

Good: Noticeable, heavy wear has reduced the entire design to just a few elements. A silver dollar with extensive wear is designated as 'good' condition. Wear has removed most detail leaving Liberty as an outline in low relief. Remaining are a few and now flattened hair curls showing behind her neck and ear. In this condition your 1881 Morgan silver dollar value is tied to bullion silver price.

Coin Values CoinStudy Articles

Date by Date
In Depth Morgan Silver Dollar Value
1878 to 1921

1878

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Every collector admires these large silver coins, every collector wants one. Their popularity is immense. Worth over $24.55 each because of silver content alone. Check your coins with the grading images and value charts. Find a rare date, mintmark or a better condition coin and Morgan silver dollar values start climbing.

Check all your Silver Dollar values with the coin value chart, separating the common from the rare. From the early Bust and Seated Liberty Dollars to Morgan and Peace silver dollars. Rising silver prices, increasing demand from both collectors and rare coin dealers requires a second look at your old coins.

Coin Values Discovery finds.. 1881 Morgan Silver Dollar Value and..

It is an excellent index with images and text links to all coin series, from Cents to Gold. Value charts, grading images and descriptions uncovers 1881 Morgan silver dollar value also all common to rare coin values found in your box of old coins.

Safe Coin Storage Recommendations

Recommendations on basic supplies that greatly improve coin storage. Providing for safe handling, preserving of value and organizing your box of old coins. Old silver dollars need a certain amount of careful handling to maintain their appeal to collectors. Housing them safely is covered in the Safe Coin Storage article.

A hoard of 16,000 Morgan dollars stored in canvas bags in a New York City bank vault since their purchase in 1964 from the Treasury Department stockpile will be placed on the market after all are graded and slabbed by Numismatic Guaranty Corp.

Jeff Garrett, founder and president of Mid-American Rare Coin Galleries in Lexington, Kentucky, will be offering the coins in the hoard.

He values the hoard of dollars at between $1 million and $1.5 million.

Garrett said the estimated value of the hoard will be determined by the certified grade each coin receives. Garrett is working on commission, on behalf of heirs who more than a decade ago inherited the silver dollars from their parents.

Garrett said the son and daughter of the man who originally purchased the coins more than 50 years ago no longer wanted to continue paying the $800 annual rental fee for the roughly 3-foot by 3-foot by 4-foot safe-deposit box that houses the silver dollars.

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Garrett said the heirs do not want to be identified but just want to dispose of the hoard.

Garrett said the heirs’ father worked in the financial district in lower Manhattan, and the coins were stored in a bank vault on Wall Street.

The coins in the hoard were contained in 16 canvas bags of 1,000 coins each, with each bag comprising coins of a specific date and Mint production facility. Garrett said the hoard has no bags containing mixed dates.

The bags were wire sealed with string and lead clamps and also bore tags from Brooklyn dealer Edward’s Associate, a numismatic firm specializing in silver dollars.

Silver

“The family purchased them from this broker when the Treasury distributed the bags in 1964,” Garrett said. “That’s when the box was opened at the bank. The coins have been there since.”

Some of the bags were imprinted with the designation for U.S. Mint and Treasury Department and others with the designation for the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.

The coins were struck at the Philadelphia, San Francisco and New Orleans Mints. None of the coins are from the Carson City Mint, Garrett said.

Once graded, the hoard coins will affect the NGC certified populations for the dates and Mint marks represented in the bags.

The hoard contains 1878-S, 1880-S, 1881-S, 1883, 1884, 1884-O, 1885, 1886, 1887, 1888 and 1889 Morgan dollars. Garrett said several hundred of the coins exhibit toning from their storage in the canvas bags.

Coin handling

Garrett said he, his son Ben, and Mark Salzberg, chairman of Certified Collectibles Group (NGC’s parent company), spent May 28, 29 and part of May 30 handling each of the 16,000 coins.

The bags were removed carefully from the safe-deposit box to minimize creation of more marks than they may originally have. Garrett said the coins were removed slowly from each bag, with the best pieces set aside, placed into 2-inch by 2-inch coin flips. The remaining coins were individually placed into coin tubes, to be shipped by Brink’s from the New York bank to Florida, for grading and encapsulation at NGC’s facility in Sarasota.

Government hoard

1881 Silver Dollar Value Miss Liberty

The 16,000 silver dollars stored in the Wall Street bank vault were among the more than 200 million Morgan dollars sitting in Treasury vaults when the government decided in the early 1960s to allow an exchange of other currency for silver dollars, at face value.

Interested parties could line up to acquire up to 50,000 silver dollars from the Treasury Department’s main building, in Washington, D.C., where the coins were stored in vaults. Some enterprising individuals made some early money by selling their places in the line of those waiting to purchase the coins.

1881 Silver Dollar Value Uncirculated

Treasury Secretary Douglas C. Dillon halted the exchange March 26, 1964, leaving some 2.9 million silver dollars, mostly Carson City Mint pieces, in 1,000-coin bags remaining at the bottom of the vaults.

Those silver dollars were auctioned in a series of five sales starting in October 1972, after Congress in 1970 authorized their sale by the General Services Administration.

The coins sold from these auctions were known as the GSA hoard. By 1979, that remaining silver dollar supply was exhausted.

Millions of coins

The government stockpile of silver dollars traces its genesis to the Bland-Allison Act of 1878, which authorized the four Mint production facilities to begin striking millions of dollar coins using silver from the Comstock Lode.

Within 15 years, the American people’s preference for the convenience of carrying paper currency was obvious, but Morgan dollars were minted through 1904 when the supply of silver from the Comstock Lode was depleted.

To replenish the government’s silver bullion supply, Congress legislated melting the silver dollars, under the Pittman Act of 1918.

More than 270 million silver dollars were melted under that legislation, an amount totaling nearly the half the combined production from 1878 through 1904.

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The silver dollars melted under the Pittman Act significantly reduced the surviving populations of coins dated 1900 through 1904.

However, the Pittman Act required the government to purchase more silver on the open market to replace the coins melted, resulting in resumption of silver dollar production in 1921, first with the Morgan designs and then the Peace dollar designs.

Between 1958 and 1960, nearly 58 million silver dollars stored in government vaults were released.

In 1963 alone, 31 million silver dollars were released, and another 25 million in just the first three months of 1964, before the distribution was ended.